historicalmarkers Photos & Videos

1 day ago

Slight change in our post schedule for today, Thanks to our follower @irish69_ for sharing this marker with us.... 400 years today Slavery in Virginia dates to 1619,Africans first appeared in Virginia in 1619, brought by English privateers from a Spanish slave ship they had intercepted. Some laws regarding slavery of Africans were passed in the seventeenth century and codified into Virginia's first slave code in 1705. Among laws affecting slaves was one of 1662, which said that children born in the colony would take the social status of their mothers, regardless of who their fathers were. This was in contrast to English common law of the time, and resulted in generation after generation of enslaved persons, including mixed-race children and adults, some of whom were majority white. Among the most notable were Sally Hemings and her siblings, fathered by planter John Wayles, and her four surviving children by Thomas Jefferson. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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3 days ago

This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the history of Clarence Jordan, founder of Koinonia Farm, and his “Cotton Patch” translation of the New Testament. As the surrounding community pressured the farm to revoke their principles of inclusivity of people of all races during the Civil Rights Movement, Jordan believed he should place a mirror in front of the tormentors by talking about contemporary issues in the context of the New Testament. Tom Key, actor, director, and playwright, later visited Clarence Jordan on Koinonia Farm for the research needed to bring Jordan’s translation to life in The Cotton Patch Gospel, an off-Broadway musical. For the full blog post, find the link in the bio. #historicalmarkers #exploregeorgia #georgiahistory #history #koinoniafarm #americusgeorgia #offboadway #civilrights #civilrightstrail #gacivilrightstrail #cottonpatchgospel #musical #tocottonpatch #simplicity #nonviolence #equality

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3 days ago

Carver Theatre is a historic African American movie theater in Columbia, South Carolina. It was built in 1941, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick commercial building. It has a flat roof and a vertical marquee. It operated as a movie theater until 1971 #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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6 days ago

The Lighthouse & Informer, long the leading black newspaper in S.C., was a weekly published here from 1941 to 1954 by journalist and civil rights advocate John Henry McCray. McCray published articles covering every aspect of black life and columns and editorials advocating equal rights. In 1944, after the S.C. General Assembly repealed laws regulating primaries and the S.C. Democratic Party excluded blacks from voting in them, John H. McCray helped found the Progressive Democratic Party, the first black Democratic party in the South. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 week ago

Benedict College is a four-year historically black, liberal arts college located in Columbia, South Carolina. Founded in 1870 by northern Baptists, it was originally a teachers' college. It has since expanded into a full four-year college offering a variety of majors in the liberal arts field. Benedict College was founded in 1870 on a 110-acre (45 ha) plantation in Columbia, South Carolina. Under the auspices of the American Baptist Home Mission Society, Mrs. Bathsheba A. Benedict of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, provided the amount of $13,000.00 to purchase the land to open Benedict Institute on December 12, 1870.This new school was established for the recently emancipated people of African descent. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 week ago

When the Mildred B. Poole Elementary School — named for the woman who opened a Fort Bragg school to black students before Brown v. Board of Education forced integration... In September 1951 Fort Bragg school system superintendent Mildred Poole, with the support of military liaison Capt. F. J. Donoghue, integrated the Main Post School. Her action, which involved the integration of thirty-three black children (previously bused into Fayetteville) with 1,208 white elementary students, drew press coverage but little resistance on-base. The Associated Press story was carried in papers across the nation and an article appeared in Jet. The bold move, the first at a military installation in the South, came three years after Truman’s desegregation of the military and three years before the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka declaring separate schools for blacks and whites to be unconstitutional. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 week ago

This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the history of the Nacoochee Valley: Valley of the Evening Star. Although the Nacoochee Valley was “devastated by Spanish and American gold hunters and timbermen,” the use of the land by prospectors and timbermen illustrated how the land was used for centuries prior. A letter to The Southern Banner on June 8, 1834, revealed that while digging a canal to wash the mined gold, the miners found log “cabins” covered by earth. This discovery did not halt the search for gold, but it opened the doors for archaeologists to begin looking into the long history of occupation of the Nacoochee Valley. For the full blog post, find the link in the bio. Image Credit: David Seibert #georgiahistory #exploregeorgia #historicalmarkers #GeorgiaDNR #nacoocheevalley #nacoochee #smithsonian #gahistory #georgiagoldrush #discoveries #georgiahistoricalsociety #whitecounty #gold #ugaanthropology

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1 week ago

iPhone picture of the moment: historical marker erected yesterday in front of the McAllister house at 1403 Main Street in Vicksburg, Mississippi commemorating the life and work of Dr. Jane Ellen McAllister. Dr. McAllister taught for 50 years at historically black colleges and universities. I wrote my master’s thesis on her at the University of Minnesota in 1991. #vicksburg #mississippi #fiskuniversity #southernuniversity #blackeducators #blackeducation #talledegacollege #jacksonstateuniversity #historicalmarkers #universityofminnesota #teacherscollege #alphakappaalphasorority

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1 week ago

#augustteacherphotochallenge Day 9: black and white #lategram (again) This is my first example of an extra credit assignment I want to offer this year. Take a picture with a historical marker and then dig deeper into the story. Robert Ruark was an author and journalist. He started college at 15 years old. He wrote a column in the Washington Daily news that earned him more than $40,000 a year in the 1940s. He had served in World War II as a gunnery officer and a press censor. #teachersofinstagram #extracredit #historicalmarkers #wilmingtonnc #southportnc

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2 weeks ago

Anthony Burns (31 May 1834 – 17 July 1862) was a fugitive slave whose recapturing, extradition, and court case led to wide-scale public outcries of injustice, and ultimately, increased opposition to slavery by Northerners. Burns was born a slave in Stafford County, Virginia. As a young man, he became a Baptist and a "slave preacher" at the Falmouth Union Church in Falmouth, Virginia. In 1853, he escaped from slavery and reached Boston, where he started working. The following year, he was captured under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 and tried in court. The Fugitive Slave Act was fiercely resisted in Boston, and Burns' case attracted national publicity, including large demonstrations, protests, attacks, and violence. Federal troops were employed to ensure Burns was transported without interference to a ship headed back to Virginia post-trial. Burns was eventually ransomed from slavery, with his freedom purchased by Boston sympathizers. Afterwards, he was educated at Oberlin College and became a Baptist preacher, moving to Upper Canada for a position, where he remained until his death. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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2 weeks ago

Lovely little place just north of Peebles Island State Park. Unique sign format!

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2 weeks ago

This week’s #MarkerMonday discusses Benton MacKaye, the developer of the Appalachian Trail. With his article “An Appalachian Trail: A Project in Regional Planning,” he advocated for the preservation of wild lands in the eastern United States. Follow the link for the full blog post. https://georgiahistory.com/marker-monday-the-appalachian-trail/ Image Credit: David Seibert #appalachiantrail #appalachianmountains #hikinggeorgia #springermountain #appalachiantrail2019 #mtkatahdin #georgiahistory #exploregeorgia #historicalmarkers #GeorgiaDNR #gahistory

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2 weeks ago

Mount Moriah Baptist Church and Cemetery is a historic African-American Baptist church and cemetery located at Roanoke, Virginia. It was built about 1908, and is a small, one-story, rectangular frame church sheathed in weatherboard. It consists of a main sanctuary, a front vestibule, and a rear chancel bay. The frame building sits on a raised foundation of uncoursed fieldstones. The associated burial ground contains over 100 interments from the 1870s through the present. #RoanokeVA #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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2 weeks ago

Oscar Devereaux Micheaux; January 2, 1884 – March 25, 1951) was an African-American author, film director and independent producer of more than 44 films. Although the short-lived Lincoln Motion Picture Company was the first movie company owned and controlled by black filmmakers, Micheaux is regarded as the first major African-American feature filmmaker, a prominent producer of race film, and has been described as "the most successful African-American filmmaker of the first half of the 20th century". He produced both silent films and sound films when the industry changed to incorporate speaking actors. #blacktheatre #blackdirectors #RoanokeVA #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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2 weeks ago

Is it possible to take the small town I grew up in on the west side of Cleveland, and celebrate the people who migrated there with two weapons—farming skills and dreams?

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3 weeks ago

Edward Waters College is a private college in Jacksonville, Florida. It was founded in 1866 by members of the AME Church as a school to educate freedmen and their children. It was the first independent institution of higher education and the first historically black college in the State of Florida. It continues to be affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a member of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida. Originally named the college as Brown Theological Institute. the school closed for much of the 1870s. It reopened in 1883 as "East Florida Conference High School”, then changed to “East Florida Scientific and Divinity High School”. In 1892, the school was renamed for Edward Waters, the third bishop of the AME Church #Blackhistory101 #jacksonvilleFL #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

300
3 weeks ago

Brewster Hospital was the first African American hospital in the U.S. It served African Americans in Jacksonville from 1901 to 1966. It was founded in 1901 as the George A. Brewster Hospital and School of Nurse Training, because there was no place for Negroes to go to for treatment after the disastrous Great Fire of 1901. Its sponsor was the Women's Division of the Methodist Board of Missions.(As in other Southern cities, white hospitals did not treat Negroes before the Civil Rights Act of 1964.) It closed in 1966 because, like Florida A&M Hospital, the **forced integration** of white hospitals meant it lost its funding. The building was gutted and rebuilt as Methodist Hospital, opening in 1967. The original building is no longer in use, was recently moved and is being preserved. #Blackhistory101 #jacksonvilleFL #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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4 weeks ago

On Saturday, August 27,1960, 40 Youth Council demonstrators from the Jacksonville Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) advised by local civil rights leader Rutledge H. Pearson (1929-1967), sat in at the W.T. Grant Department Store, then located at the corner of West Adams and North Main Streets, and at Woolworth's Five and Ten Cent Store on Hogan Street across from Hemming Park. Seeking access to the whites-only lunch counters, the youths were met by 150 white males wielding axe handles and baseball bats. Many of the youths were injured while others sought safety at the adjacent Snyder Memorial Methodist Church. Although not the beginning of the Jacksonville civil rights movement, this conflict was a turning point. It awakened many to the seriousness of the African-American community's demand for equal rights, equal opportunity, human dignity, and respect, and inspired further resolve in supporters to accomplish these goals. Within the decade, lunch counters were integrated, Duval County public schools began to desegregate, four African-Americans were elected to City Council, and segregation of public #Blackhistory101 #jacksonvilleFL #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

311
1 month ago

Midway A.M.E. Church was organized on Sunday, June 10, 1865, a few weeks after the Confederate Army in Florida surrendered to the Union Army. It was thus the first black independent church organized in Florida. William G. Steward was sent to Florida by the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and founded a church at Midway, a settlement east of Jacksonville, on his second day in the state. Mr. Steward appointed Brother G. B. Hill as the pastor of Midway Church before going on to organize congregations in middle Florida and in the panhandle section of the state. In later years Mr. Steward became involved in politics in Leon and Gadsden Counties and served a term in the Florida Legislature. Midway Church is recognized as the "mother" of both the Florida Conference of the A.M.E. Church, organized in 1867 in Tallahassee, and of the East Florida Conference organized in Palatka in 1877. While the original church building is no longer standing, the congregation of "Mother" Midway has been in continuous existence since its founding. #Blackhistory101 #jacksonvilleFL #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

324
1 month ago

The founders of Second Missionary Baptist Church worshipped at Bethel Baptist Church with their slaves masters in the 1830s. They built their first separate wooden sanctuary in 1848 in the African American neighborhood of LaVilla. The first sanctuary was destroyed by The Great Jacksonville Fire of 1901 that scoured more than 146 blocks and left nearly 9,000 people homeless. Church members worshipped at a new location and in 1930 built this brick sanctuary. Designed as a vernacular adaptation of the Late Gothic Revival Style, the sanctuary reflects the religious architectural form of the period with pitched gable roofs, massive towers framing the entrance, and ornate Gothic-arched stained glass windows. The church served as a refuge and source of strength during the racially segregated 19th and 20th centuries. Its members provided essential support for LaVilla businesses, schools, and the Brewster Hospital, the county's first African American hospital. Church services, educational activities, and charity drives helped meet the social, spiritual, and physical needs of the community. This sanctuary is a reminder of the significant role the church played in the LaVilla community. #Blackhistory101 #jacksonvilleFL #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

311
1 month ago

Up until the creation of this insurance company, black Americans found it difficult to purchase life insurance, which was unaffordable to most blacks at the time. The insurance company also served as a financial institution as well. The company is responsible for the creation of American Beach in Nassau County, Florida. With strong competition from other insurance companies in the mid-20th century, the Afro-American Life Insurance Company closed its door in 1990. The building located at 101 E. Union Street, which housed the company has been renovated and served as the offices for Congresswoman Corrine Brown and other businesses. (Marker was too close to the building to get the other side) #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 month ago

One room school that was used to educate African American children from approximately 1915 to the late 1940s. Grades 1 through 7 were all taught in one room with as many as 50 children and "one small library of 20 books over in the corner". First teacher was J.L. Lash who was licensed by Israel Butner, first superintendent of Forsyth County schools. Abraham Speas also taught at Cedar Grove. #Bethania #northcarolina #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

413
1 month ago

A Director friend of mine inspired me, while scouting one of his movies, to stop at #historicalmarkers “They’re like mini museums.” This one is in Nebraska, west of Cairo - about artist Solon Borglum. IMO state tourism should promote these stops.

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1 month ago

The community established along this road in the Bethania Town Lot was built by African-American men and women who began acquiring land here following the Civil War. Many of these people had been enslaved on the Oak Grove plantation, from which they had purchased much of this land. The area became a thriving historic African-American community, and included a church, school, stores, canning factory, farms, and a popular fishing lake. The nearby church, established by Bethania Moravians in 1850, became Bethania A.M.E. Zion Church in 1875, and continues to serve at its original location. Descendants of early families continue to live in this historically significant community. #Bethania #northcarolina #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 month ago

Rose Butler Browne (1897-1986) was an African American educator, engineer and author of Love My Children. Rose Butler Browne was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1897. She moved with her family to Newport, Rhode Island where she grew up. While working as a live-in domestic she earned a bachelor's degree at Rhode Island College. She went on to earn her master's degree at Rhode Island College and then to Harvard University where, in 1939 she became the first black woman to earn a doctoral degree in education. In 1950, she received an honorary degree from Rhode Island College, and in 1969 a seven-story Rhode Island College residence hall was named in her honor. Browne died in 1986 at the age of 89. #BullCityBlues #BlackDurham #OurHistory #OurHistorymatters #Historicalplaces #Historicalmarkers #NCHistoricsites #northcarolina #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplaces

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1 month ago

Evans Metropolitan AME Zion Church is a historic African Methodist Episcopal church located at 301 N. Cool Spring Street in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, North Carolina. It was built in 1893-1894, and is a five bay, rectangular brick building in the Gothic Revivalstyle. The front facade features flanking towers. Also on the property is a contributing house built in 1913 used as an office/administration building. It is a two-story frame house with a hipped roof and wraparound porch. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. No physical marker on site #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #fayettevilleNC #easterncarolina #northcarolina #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplaces

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1 month ago

St. Joseph's Episcopal Church is a historic African-American Episcopal parish churchcomplex located at Fayetteville, Cumberland County, North Carolina. Its historic church at Ramsey and Moore Streets was built in 1896. It is a low, shingled, Queen Anne style frame church with English Gothic and Spanishaccents. It features a three-part stained glass window, deeply projecting semi-octagonal chancel, and steeply pitched main roof with exposed rafters. Also on the property are the contributing Parish House and Parsonage. It was chartered in 1873, and is the second oldest Episcopal congregation in Fayetteville. **No official marker, but has been listed as a NRHP since 1982 #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #fayettevilleNC #easterncarolina #northcarolina #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplaces

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1 month ago

A little park clean up this morning, corner of N. South and Birdsall streets. So happy to see the marker dedicating the park to the Galvins again! Swipe to see the before picture. Just one hour of volunteer work improved this corner a lot! Happy Independence Day! . . . #park #thisplacematters #gardens #historicalmarkers

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1 month ago

Charles Waddell Chesnutt (June 20, 1858 – November 15, 1932) was an African-American author, essayist, political activist and lawyer, best known for his novels and short stories exploring complex issues of racial and social identity in the post-Civil War South. Two of his books were adapted as silent films in 1926 and 1927 by the African-American director and producer Oscar Micheaux. Following the Civil Rights Movement during the 20th century, interest in the works of Chesnutt was revived. Several of his books were published in new editions, and he received formal recognition. A commemorative stamp was printed in 2008. During the early 20th century in Cleveland, Chesnutt established what became a highly successful court reporting business, which provided his main income. He became active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, writing articles supporting education as well as legal challenges to discriminatory laws. #fayettevilleNC #easterncarolina #northcarolina #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 month ago

Spent 24 hrs in Monteagle and Sewanee, TN. Stayed at the Smoke House Lodge (note the phone on the bedside table), the 2 story guitar by the sign and the sign directing the likes of me ☮️✌🏼to the back door. Then did a drive thru of The University of the South (dining hall pictured) and its beautiful campus. Noted a few interesting road signs and historic markers. Enjoyed a slice of apple pie & an ice tea @thebluechairsewanee then caught up with Vic @shenanigans for lunch with Vic and his hiking friends. The final sign "🚫guns" was seen on the wall at #shenanigans 🙌🏼 in #Sewanee #trailoftears #monteagletennessee #thesmokehouselodge #theuniversityofthesouth #historicalmarkers #theperimetertrail #travelergramalabama #travelergrammichigan #travelalittleseealittlelearnalittle

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1 month ago

Hiram Rhodes Revels (September 27, 1827 – January 16, 1901) was a Republican U.S. Senator, minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and a college administrator. Born free in North Carolina, he later lived and worked in Ohio, where he voted before the Civil War. He became the first African American to serve in the U.S. Congress when he was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican to represent Mississippi in 1870 and 1871 during the Reconstruction era. #fayettevilleNC #easterncarolina #northcarolina #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #Nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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