historicalmarkers Photos & Videos

2 days ago

#repost from @discovering_black_history #reposta #reposta_app @reposta_app NC MutualA(originally theANorth Carolina Mutual and Provident AssociationAand laterANorth Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company) is an AmericanAlife insuranceAcompany located in downtownADurham, North CarolinaAand one of the most influentialAAfrican-American businessesAin United States history. Founded in 1898 by local black social leaders, its business increased from less than a thousand dollars in income in 1899 to a quarter of a million dollars in 1910.AThe company specialized in "industrial insurance," which was basically burial insurance. The company hired salesmen whose main job was to collect small payments (of about 10 cents) to cover the insured person for the next week. If the person died while insured, the company immediately paid benefits of about 100 dollars. This covered the cost of a suitable funeral, which was a high prestige item in the black community. It began operations in the new tobacco manufacturing city of Durham, North Carolina, and moved north into Virginia and Maryland, then to major northern black urban centers, and then to the rest of the urban South. For much of the 20th century it was the largest company run byAAfrican Americans, and it is the largest and oldest African American life insurance company in the United States to this day . . . North Carolina Mutual Building, also known as the Blue Palace Tea Shop and Barber Shop, is a historic commercial building located at Columbia, South Carolina. It was built in 1909 by the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, and is a three-story, rectangular, brick commercial block. The building housed African-American businesses, professionals, and institutions during the years of Jim Crow segregation. It is located in the Washington Street business district, the city's black downtown. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #AP

41
2 days ago

NC Mutual (originally the North Carolina Mutual and Provident Association and later North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company) is an American life insurance company located in downtown Durham, North Carolina and one of the most influential African-American businesses in United States history. Founded in 1898 by local black social leaders, its business increased from less than a thousand dollars in income in 1899 to a quarter of a million dollars in 1910. The company specialized in "industrial insurance," which was basically burial insurance. The company hired salesmen whose main job was to collect small payments (of about 10 cents) to cover the insured person for the next week. If the person died while insured, the company immediately paid benefits of about 100 dollars. This covered the cost of a suitable funeral, which was a high prestige item in the black community. It began operations in the new tobacco manufacturing city of Durham, North Carolina, and moved north into Virginia and Maryland, then to major northern black urban centers, and then to the rest of the urban South. For much of the 20th century it was the largest company run by African Americans, and it is the largest and oldest African American life insurance company in the United States to this day . . . North Carolina Mutual Building, also known as the Blue Palace Tea Shop and Barber Shop, is a historic commercial building located at Columbia, South Carolina. It was built in 1909 by the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, and is a three-story, rectangular, brick commercial block. The building housed African-American businesses, professionals, and institutions during the years of Jim Crow segregation. It is located in the Washington Street business district, the city's black downtown. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

341
5 days ago

The Virginia Creeper Trail from White Top Station to Damascus. *SCROLL THROUGH* :) This portion of the trail is approximately 17 miles and almost entirely downhill. Enjoy the scenery of flowing water, rhododendron, hemlocks, rock faces and tall bridges! There are several places in Damascus, VA to rent a bike and get a shuttle to the top of the mountain where you will ride back to the bike store. #virginiacreepertrail #damascus #damascusva #abingdonva #biking #mountainbiking #mountainbikinglife #mountainbikingtrails #thewildernessperspective #nature #naturephotography #historical #historicalmarkers

80
5 days ago

Sidney Park Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, also known as Sidney Park Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, is a historic Methodist Episcopalchurch located at Columbia, South Carolina. It was built in 1893, and is a brick Late Gothic Revival style church. It features the only set of octagonal towers in Columbia; each is topped by an octagonal steeple. The church also has lancet windows and pointed arches, wall buttresses, and a heavy timber truss system. The African-American congregation has a long history of involvement with civil rights activity and connection with the NAACP. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

171
1 week ago

Educator and civil rights leader Benjamin Mack (1916-1970) lived in this house from the late 1950s until his death in 1970. Mack was a graduate of Booker T. Washington H.S. and S.C. State Univ. He taught at Lower Richland H.S. in the 1940s where he was known as "Professor B.J. Mack." He married Gladys Hendrix of Batesburg, who operated a daycare center here. They raised two children. Mack also served as a Deacon at Ridgewood Baptist Church. In the 1960s Mack served as the State Field Secretary for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in S.C. As part of his work with SCLC he taught courses in African American history for the Citizenship Education Program (CEP). With SCLC and CEP Mack worked with Martin Luther King Jr., Andrew Young, and Septima Clark. He remained committed to SCLC's mission of non-violent direct action and helped plan both the 1963 March on Washington and 1968 Poor People's Campaign. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

110
1 week ago

During the Civil Rights Movement, members of the African-American community pressured the Mayor and City Council of Atlanta to integrate the city's fire department. In 1962, Mayor Ivan Alan, authorized the first hiring of sixteen African American firemen. On April 1, 1963, after completing training, they were housed at Fire Station No. 16, as stations were not yet integrated. Located in 1048 Simpson Rd. (now Joseph E. Boone Blvd.), the station was built upon the former property of Theodore “Tiger” Flowers, the world's first African American middleweight champion. #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

201
1 week ago

On our way to Lone Star Roundup 2019 in Palestine, Texas caching on our way #historicalmarkers

130
1 week ago

On our way to Lone Star Roundup 2019 in Palestine, Texas caching on our way #historicalmarkers

130
1 week ago

On our way to Lone Star Roundup 2019 in Palestine, Texas caching on our way #historicalmarkers

160
1 week ago

On our way to Lone Star Roundup 2019 in Palestine, Texas caching on our way #historicalmarkers

110
1 week ago

On our way to Lone Star Roundup 2019 in Palestine, Texas caching on our way #historicalmarkers

140
1 week ago

#repost from @discovering_black_history #reposta #reposta_app @reposta_app Theodore "Tiger" Flowers (August 5, 1895 a November 16, 1927) was an American professional boxer. Nicknamed "The Georgia Deacon", he rose to prominence in the early 20th century, becoming the first African-American World Middleweight Boxing Champion after defeating Harry Greb to claim the title in 1926. He was inducted into The Ring Hall of Fame in 1971, The Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1976, The World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990, and The International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1993. #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #preservinghistory #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #preservingblackhistory #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

81
1 week ago

Theodore "Tiger" Flowers (August 5, 1895 – November 16, 1927) was an American professional boxer. Nicknamed "The Georgia Deacon", he rose to prominence in the early 20th century, becoming the first African-American World Middleweight Boxing Champion after defeating Harry Greb to claim the title in 1926. He was inducted into The Ring Hall of Fame in 1971, The Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1976, The World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990, and The International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1993. #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

241
2 weeks ago

This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the history of Cedartown, formerly Cedar Town, and Big Spring Park. Paulding County, Georgia, was created as a result of the Cherokee Land Lottery in 1832. Many people such as Asa Prior, mentioned on the historical marker, purchased or won the land surrounding Big Spring and Cedar Creek, which later became part of Polk County. As new landowners continued to spread across North Georgia, the Treaty of New Echota was signed by a minority leader of the Cherokee Nation without consent from Cherokee Chief John Ross in 1835. The Treaty allowed Cherokee landowners to receive monetary compensation for their property, but a majority did not support the ratified terms. Their rejection led to the Cherokees’ forced removal by the U.S. government on the Trail of Tears to the West. Click the link in our bio to learn more about the enactment of the Trail of Tears in Cedar Town and the Trail of Tears. #bigspringpark #historicalmarker #historicalmarkers #georgiahistory #gahistory #blog #historyblogger #historyblog #trailoftears #ushistory #nativeamericanhistory #cherokeehistory

272
2 weeks ago

March 1961 marked a turning point in the Atlanta Student Movement. After a year of protests, white civic leaders had agreed to desegregate some businesses and schools. But disagreement within the black community over the desegregation plan’s timeline and scope threatened the deal. The student-led Committee on Appeal for Human Rights demanded immediate and total desegregation, but black civic leaders A.T. Walden and Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., had agreed to gradual and partial desegregation. The intergenerational feud reached a climax during a community meeting at Warren Memorial. Critics angrily attacked the plan. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., stepped into the fray. He decried “the cancerous disease of disunity” in an impassioned address. Dr. King’s critique of black discord—a lesson for the ages—facilitated compromise and acceptance #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

161
2 weeks ago

The Atlanta Student Movement was formed between February and March 1960 in Atlanta by students of the campuses Atlanta University Center (AUC). It was led by the Committee on the Appeal for Human Rights (COAHR) and was part of the Civil Rights Movement.On February 5, 1960 Lonnie King and Julian Bonddiscussed the idea of following in the foot steps of the Greensboro sit-ins with the idea to organize similar actions in Atlanta. King, Bond and fellow members of the All-University Student Leadership Group were soon summoned to a meeting with the presidents of all six Atlanta University Center (AUC) colleges. In an attempt to lessen the likeliehood of immediate direct action (such as organizing Sit-ins), the AUC challenged the students to instead write a document outlining their position. #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

262
3 weeks ago

An Appeal for Human Rights was drafted by Roslyn Pope and other students of the Atlanta University Center after the students, led by Lonnie King and Julian Bond, were encouraged by the six presidents of the Atlanta University Center to draft a document released on March 15, 1960. The students, organized as the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights (COAHR), published "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960 working within and part of the Civil Rights Movement. The published document, "An Appeal for Human Rights" was a widely circulated and initially printed on March 9, 1960 in several publications including Atlanta Constitution (today The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), Atlanta Journal (today also The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), and Atlanta Daily World. The "Appeal for Human Rights" was received with both positive acclaim, and skeptical criticism at the time of publishing. #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

324
3 weeks ago

Win a thing in our scavenger hunt! This bonus-points sign will help. Post a selfie with this sign and earn 20 points. Rules are below. The rules are simple: -First, you must share one of our scavenger hunt posts to be entered. -Next, go take pictures of NYS Historical Markers. Every marker earns you a point. -The photo must include you and the marker. If your ride is included, that gets a bonus point. -Tag @motoclectic and at least one friend in your photo. -A bonus point is awarded for every Motoclectic advertiser you tag. -Ends 11:59pm Oct 20, 2019 EST; winner will be announced soon thereafter. -This hunt is on FB as well. -Motoclectic will post opportunities for bonus points, so watch our feed! #nys #wny #rochesterny #fingerlakes #motorcycle #scavengerhunt #rust1894 #history #nyshistory #historicalmarkers #explore #iloveny #adventure #motulnation #nylovesfall #yesny @rust1894 @naan.tastic @leafandbeancoffee @curtissmuseum @streetskillsmoto @gpal993 @motoz999 @stanshd @thirdeyedesigninc @cortesecyclesales @yngodess @lowborngarage @areteautosalon @kustomworkz @harvsharley @motorcyclepedia @dirtyforgood @roc_coatings @motulusa

220
3 weeks ago

It’s a beautiful day to explore the harbor and visit the museum! We’re open until 5pm!

312
3 weeks ago

Located near the campus of Clark Atlanta University, Rush Memorial Congregational Church became the headquarters for planning meetings of the Atlanta Student Movement. A Georgia Historical Society marker located in front of the church tells the story of the church's support for the movement. As the student movement gained momentum, administrators at the black colleges would not allow the students to meet in campus facilities. Rev. Joseph E. Boone, a civil rights activist, provided an office space for students, and the congregation assisted with food and supplies #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

221
4 weeks ago

Completed in 1910, the Herndon Home, was the residence of Alonzo Herndon and his family. Herdon was a former slave raised in a sharecropping family after the Civil War. Herndon studied barbering, and owned and managed a string of barbershops in downtown Atlanta after the Civil War, one of which was considered to be the most elegant in the country with marble floors and chandelier. Investing his income into real estate, Herndon became the largest black property owner in Atlanta by 1900. Later, Herndon founded the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, located in the Sweet Auburn Historic District, and became Atlanta's first black millionaire. The home was primarily designed by Adrienne Herndon, Alonzo's first wife and a teacher atAtlanta University. The couple had one son, Norris. Adrienne died of Addison's disease just three months after the home was completed. In 1912 Alonzo married Jessie Gillespie. The Herndon home is a two-story, 15-room Beaux Arts mansion built by local black craftsmen. The formally composed building is constructed with multi-colored brick, and features a two-story entry portico supported by Corinthian columns. One-story porches to each side of the building echo this theme in brick piers and wooden capitals. An elliptical fanlight over the main entrance and the balustrade above the full entablature of the building's cornice add a distinctly Georgian Revival flavor to this imposing residence. The Herndon Home is a lasting tribute to the hard work and talent of extraordinary African Americans in Atlanta, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2000. #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

240
4 weeks ago

1 of the things I love about Texas is in every county seat I've been to, they have a glorious courthouse. San Saba, Texas was no different. They are undergoing construction again, but it looks to be only to strengthen the integrity of the building, not to redesign it. I could be wrong. Here's the Historical Mrarker from the Courthouse: "In 1856, the Texas legislature created and organized San Saba County. A two-story frame courthouse (1857-1878) and later a stone courthouse (1878-1901) on this site served the county and provided space for public gatherings. In 1910, the city of San Saba incorporated, and county residents, spurred by news of a railroad connection, authorized a new courthouse. Alabama architect Walter Chamberlain designed this classical revival building, faced in pressed brick and rusticated sandstone: completed by the time train's arrival in August 1911, it serves as the seat of justice from the people to the people. (2004) @sansabatx @texashillcountrylife #homeschool #unschooling #education #history #courthouses #texas #roadtrip #drone #dronestagram #dji #djimavicpro2 #historicalmarkers

110
1 month ago

Scavenger hunt bonus points! (You win something! See previous posts for all the details) The rules are simple: -You must share this post to be entered. -Post pictures of NYS Historical Markers. Every marker earns you a point. -The photo must include you and the marker. If your ride is included, that gets a bonus point. -Tag @motoclectic and at least one friend in your photo. -A bonus point is awarded for every Motoclectic advertiser you tag. -Ends 11:59pm Oct 20, 2019 EST; winner will be announced soon thereafter. -Motoclectic will post opportunities for bonus points, so watch our feed! #nys #wny #rochesterny #fingerlakes #motorcycle #scavengerhunt #rust1894 #history #nyshistory #historicalmarkers #explore #iloveny #adventure #motulnation #nylovesfall #yesny @rust1894 @naan.tastic @leafandbeancoffee @curtissmuseum @streetskillsmoto @gpal993 @motoz999 @stanshd @thirdeyedesigninc @cortesecyclesales @yngodess @lowborngarage @areteautosalon @kustomworkz @harvsharley @motorcyclepedia @dirtyforgood @roc_coatings @motulusa @iloveny

160
1 month ago

Spelman College is a private, liberal arts, women's college in Atlanta, Georgia. The college is part of the Atlanta University Center academic consortium in Atlanta. Founded in 1881 as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary, Spelman received its collegiate charter in 1924, making it America's oldest private historically black liberal arts college for women. #Atlanta #AtlantaGa #BlackAtlanta #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

190
1 month ago

Advancing up the Shenandoah Valley from Harper’s Ferry to Winchester, U.S. Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan’s 600 vehicle wagon train reportedly stretched 12 miles to the rear of the army. Just after dawn on Aug. 13, 1864, C.S. Col. John Singleton Mosby and 300 partisan rangers attacked the rear section of the train near Berryville, Va. The rangers captured 200 head of cattle, over 500 horses, 100 wagons, and U.S. soldiers. After having emptied their contents, Berryville residents assisted the rangers in burning the wagons. Ranger-led tour of Mosby sites in Clark County, Va. Information at Cedar Creek and Belle Grove Historical Park nps.gov/cebe/history-at-sunset.htm #johnmosby #mosbysrangers #civilwarhistory #civilwarhistorynerd #berryvilleva #clarkecountyva #va340 #readtheplaque #alwaysreadtheplaque #virginiahistory #rangerledprograms #rangerledtour #nationalparkranger #1864campaign #shenandoahvalley #harpersferry #harpersferrywv #winchesterva #philipsheridan #historicalmarker #historicalmarkers #vahistoricalmarker

393
1 month ago

Win this Rust1894 Torque Cuff! How? See below. The rules are simple: -First, you must share this post to be entered. -Next, go take pictures of NYS Historical Markers. Every marker earns you a point. -The photo must include you and the marker. If your ride is included, that gets a bonus point. -Tag @motoclectic and at least one friend in your photo. -A bonus point is awarded for every Motoclectic advertiser you tag. -Ends 11:59pm Oct 20, 2019 EST; winner will be announced soon thereafter. -Motoclectic will post opportunities for bonus points, so watch our feed! #nys #wny #rochesterny #fingerlakes #motorcycle #scavengerhunt #rust1894 #history #nyshistory #historicalmarkers #explore #iloveny #adventure #motulnation #nylovesfall #yesny @rust1894 @naan.tastic @leafandbeancoffee @curtissmuseum @streetskillsmoto @gpal993 @motoz999 @stanshd @thirdeyedesigninc @cortesecyclesales @yngodess @lowborngarage @areteautosalon @kustomworkz @harvsharley @motorcyclepedia @dirtyforgood @roc_coatings @motulusa

190
1 month ago

Springfield Baptist Church was established on January 27, 1864, prior to the abolition of slavery, and is among the first African-American churches founded in Middle Georgia. Enslaved workers purchased land from Mrs. Nancy Bickers and began monthly meetings. Levi Thornton, a slave, served as the church’s first pastor. Prior to the Civil War most local congregations were racially integrated, though blacks and whites sat separately. However in 1867 African Americans were dismissed from local congregations. At their dismissal, the white congregations presented Springfield with $200 to help build the current building. In 1978, this property was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

203
1 month ago

I found Belva Lockwood's birthplace by happenstance. Taking a WNY shortcut to go to an antique store in Gasport NY. Made it even better that I was traveling with my BFFs from high school as we celebrated the last one of us to turn 60. There are no coincidences. Powerful women beget powerful women. We owe Belva so much, and I owe my BFFs my life. #BeLikeBelva #belvalockwood #herflag2020 #belva2020 #suffragette #19thamendment #powerfulwomen #history #historicalmarkers #supremecourt #law #shediditfirst #notoriousrbg #belvalockwoodinn #thisiswhat60lookslike #silverdisobedience #girlpower #neverthelessshepersisted #BFFs #ilny owego #flx #myflxtbex #experiencetioga

944
1 month ago

The former East White Oak School also known as East White Oak Community Center, is a historic school building for African-American students located at Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina. It was built in 1916, and is a one-story, seven bay, Colonial Revival style frame building. It features a portico supported by four solid wood columns. One-story additions were built in the 1920s or 1930s to form a square-shaped building. The school closed in 1946, and subsequently housed a YMCA and community center. Listed with the NRHP in April 1992, no official marker at location. . . . #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

415
1 month ago

Known as “the Bottom” in its earliest days, when it was settled by freed slaves after the Civil War, this square mile of Decatur was the site of a thriving African-American community of homes, business, churches, and schools. In the early part of the 20th century, the area became known as “Beacon Hill” or just “Beacon.” Like any small community, it had its own landmarks, characters, business and community leaders, and other common threads that formed a rich fabric of life. But white Decatur largely considered the Beacon Community a blighted slum, and in the 1930s began to condemn sections of it to make way for public housing. A spirit of entrepreneurship and hard work characterized the historic Beacon community – from the midwives, the bakers, the launderers, and the shop-owners to all the young people who were always expected to do their part. #AtlantaGa #DecaturGA #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

180
1 month ago

Here's to our 300th Historical marker. We have been to many states btwn N.E. to Florida, and as far as Cali on our search for Black history in the US. So much more to see, but for now cheers to #300 . . . . Alonzo Franklin Herndon (June 26, 1858 Walton County, Georgia – July 21, 1927) was an African-American entrepreneur and businessman in Atlanta, Georgia. Born into slavery, he became one of the first African-American millionaires in the United States, first achieving success by owning and operating three large barber shops in the city that served prominent white men. In 1905 he became the founder and president of what he built to be one of the United States' most well-known and successful African-American businesses, the Atlanta Family Life Insurance Company (Atlanta Life). #AtlantaGa #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

381
1 month ago

Saturday was the apple butter. The rest was today's activities. We found 200 plus canning jars someone was selling. So we took the trip on route 66. Stop by the oldest filling station still standing and stopped by Pops for soda. Even found a blue tarp in a ditch that was in good shape. One of our neighbors was trimming trees, so we stopped and helped him and in return got branches for our goats. Today was a serious win for us! #canning #applebutter #goatfood #route66 #oklahoma #historicalmarkers #helpingeachother #goodneighbors @pops.66 @historical_markers

192
1 month ago

Clinton College is a historically black, Christian college in Rock Hill, South Carolina. It is accredited by the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools. Clinton Institute was founded in 1894 and named after Bishop Caleb Isom Clinton of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church's Palmetto Conference. On June 22, 1909, it was incorporated as Clinton Normal and Industrial Institute. In 2013, the school received accreditation to become a four-year institution, changing the name from Clinton Junior College to Clinton College. Clinton College celebrated 125 years of higher education in 2019. #RockHillSC #blackRockHill #Rickhill #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

340
1 month ago

This school, founded in 1920, was the first public school for blacks in Rock Hill. Named for Emmett J. Scott (1873-1957), a prominent educator who was then secretary of Howard University, Emmett Scott School included all twelve grades until 1956 and was a junior high and high school from 1956 until South Carolina schools were desegregated in 1970. The original two-story frame school, built in 1920, was demolished in 1952. The property is now owned by the City of Rock Hill and has been a neighborhood recreation center since the school closed in 1970. #RockHillSC #blackRockHill #Rickhill #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

200
1 month ago

Dr. Matilda A. Evans, a black physician, public health and civil rights advocate, lived here from 1928 to 1935.  A graduate of the Schofield School in Aiken and Oberlin College, Evans received her M.D. from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1897.  She moved to Columbia and founded the first black hospital in the city in 1901, in a house at Taylor Street and Two Notch Road. Taylor Lane Hospital & Training School for Nurses burned in 1914.  Evans soon opened St. Luke’s Hospital & Training School for Nurses, which closed in 1918. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

453
1 month ago

This house, built after 1900, was originally a two-story frame residence with a projecting bay and wraparound porch. A fire in 1989 destroyed the second story. Barrett Visanska (1849-1932), a jeweler, bought the house in 1913. In 1938 Dr. John J. Starks, the first black president of Benedict College, bought the house and lived here from 1938 until his death. Starks was president of Seneca Institute 1899-1912, Morris College 1912-1930, and Benedict College 1930-1944. After World War II this house served as the nurses’ home for Good Samaritan-Waverly Hospital, created by merger in 1939. It was later a private residence again. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 month ago

Waverly has been one of Columbia’s most significant black communities since the 1930s. The city’s first residential suburb, it grew out of a 60-acre parcel bought by Robert Latta in 1855. Latta’s widow and children sold the first lots here in 1863. Shortly after the Civil War, banker and textile manufacturer Lysander D. Childs bought several blocks here for development. Waverly grew for the next 50 years. The City of Columbia annexed Waverly in 1913. Two black colleges, Benedict College and Allen University, drew many African Americans to this area as whites moved away. By the 1930s this community was almost entirely black. The Waverly Historic District, bounded by Gervais, Harden, and Taylor Streets and Millwood Avenue, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1989. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

454
1 month ago

This week’s #MarkerMonday explores the history of the Andrews Raid, also known as the Great Locomotive Chase. Early in the morning of April 12, 1862, in an organized band of U.S. spies captured the locomotive "General" with the intent of destroying the State Railroad between Atlanta and Chattanooga. While the train was stopped at the Big Shanty Depot, today’s Downtown Kennesaw, passengers and crew were eating breakfast at the Lacy Hotel nearby. The "General" is now housed at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History in Kennesaw. To find out more about what happened next, click the link in the bio to read the full blog post. Marker Image Credit: David Seibert Drawing Image Credit: "Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers, Based upon “the Century War Series.”" New York, NY: Century Co., 1887. #locomotive #historiclocomotive #trains #georgiahistory #exploregeorgia #historicalmarkers #GeorgiaDNR #gahistory #historyfacts #historicalmarker #georgiahistoricalsociety #cobbcounty #kennesaw #bigshanty #historicalnewspapers #greatlocomotivechase #southernmuseum

442
1 month ago

Allen University, originally founded in 1870 as Payne Institute, AME leadership relocated the school to Columbia nearly a decade later. It was renamed Allen University in honor of Bishop Richard Allen, the founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The campus features five historic buildings: Arnett Hall, named for Rev. Benjamin W. Arnett, Coppin Hall, the Canteen, Chappelle Administration Building, named for William David Chappelle, a former president, and the Joseph Simon Flipper Library. Shown is the marker, the original entrance and the sign at the current entrance. #allenuniversity HBCU #blackcollege #Blackcollegelife #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 month ago

Slight change in our post schedule for today, Thanks to our follower @irish69_ for sharing this marker with us.... 400 years today Slavery in Virginia dates to 1619,Africans first appeared in Virginia in 1619, brought by English privateers from a Spanish slave ship they had intercepted. Some laws regarding slavery of Africans were passed in the seventeenth century and codified into Virginia's first slave code in 1705. Among laws affecting slaves was one of 1662, which said that children born in the colony would take the social status of their mothers, regardless of who their fathers were. This was in contrast to English common law of the time, and resulted in generation after generation of enslaved persons, including mixed-race children and adults, some of whom were majority white. Among the most notable were Sally Hemings and her siblings, fathered by planter John Wayles, and her four surviving children by Thomas Jefferson. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

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1 month ago

This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the history of Clarence Jordan, founder of Koinonia Farm, and his “Cotton Patch” translation of the New Testament. As the surrounding community pressured the farm to revoke their principles of inclusivity of people of all races during the Civil Rights Movement, Jordan believed he should place a mirror in front of the tormentors by talking about contemporary issues in the context of the New Testament. Tom Key, actor, director, and playwright, later visited Clarence Jordan on Koinonia Farm for the research needed to bring Jordan’s translation to life in The Cotton Patch Gospel, an off-Broadway musical. For the full blog post, find the link in the bio. #historicalmarkers #exploregeorgia #georgiahistory #history #koinoniafarm #americusgeorgia #offboadway #civilrights #civilrightstrail #gacivilrightstrail #cottonpatchgospel #musical #tocottonpatch #simplicity #nonviolence #equality

350
1 month ago

Carver Theatre is a historic African American movie theater in Columbia, South Carolina. It was built in 1941, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick commercial building. It has a flat roof and a vertical marquee. It operated as a movie theater until 1971 #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

350
2 months ago

The Lighthouse & Informer, long the leading black newspaper in S.C., was a weekly published here from 1941 to 1954 by journalist and civil rights advocate John Henry McCray. McCray published articles covering every aspect of black life and columns and editorials advocating equal rights. In 1944, after the S.C. General Assembly repealed laws regulating primaries and the S.C. Democratic Party excluded blacks from voting in them, John H. McCray helped found the Progressive Democratic Party, the first black Democratic party in the South. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

440
2 months ago

Benedict College is a four-year historically black, liberal arts college located in Columbia, South Carolina. Founded in 1870 by northern Baptists, it was originally a teachers' college. It has since expanded into a full four-year college offering a variety of majors in the liberal arts field. Benedict College was founded in 1870 on a 110-acre (45 ha) plantation in Columbia, South Carolina. Under the auspices of the American Baptist Home Mission Society, Mrs. Bathsheba A. Benedict of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, provided the amount of $13,000.00 to purchase the land to open Benedict Institute on December 12, 1870.This new school was established for the recently emancipated people of African descent. #ColumbiaSC #blackColumbia #Waverly #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

300
2 months ago

When the Mildred B. Poole Elementary School — named for the woman who opened a Fort Bragg school to black students before Brown v. Board of Education forced integration... In September 1951 Fort Bragg school system superintendent Mildred Poole, with the support of military liaison Capt. F. J. Donoghue, integrated the Main Post School. Her action, which involved the integration of thirty-three black children (previously bused into Fayetteville) with 1,208 white elementary students, drew press coverage but little resistance on-base. The Associated Press story was carried in papers across the nation and an article appeared in Jet. The bold move, the first at a military installation in the South, came three years after Truman’s desegregation of the military and three years before the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka declaring separate schools for blacks and whites to be unconstitutional. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

320
2 months ago

This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the history of the Nacoochee Valley: Valley of the Evening Star. Although the Nacoochee Valley was “devastated by Spanish and American gold hunters and timbermen,” the use of the land by prospectors and timbermen illustrated how the land was used for centuries prior. A letter to The Southern Banner on June 8, 1834, revealed that while digging a canal to wash the mined gold, the miners found log “cabins” covered by earth. This discovery did not halt the search for gold, but it opened the doors for archaeologists to begin looking into the long history of occupation of the Nacoochee Valley. For the full blog post, find the link in the bio. Image Credit: David Seibert #georgiahistory #exploregeorgia #historicalmarkers #GeorgiaDNR #nacoocheevalley #nacoochee #smithsonian #gahistory #georgiagoldrush #discoveries #georgiahistoricalsociety #whitecounty #gold #ugaanthropology

500
2 months ago

iPhone picture of the moment: historical marker erected yesterday in front of the McAllister house at 1403 Main Street in Vicksburg, Mississippi commemorating the life and work of Dr. Jane Ellen McAllister. Dr. McAllister taught for 50 years at historically black colleges and universities. I wrote my master’s thesis on her at the University of Minnesota in 1991. #vicksburg #mississippi #fiskuniversity #southernuniversity #blackeducators #blackeducation #talledegacollege #jacksonstateuniversity #historicalmarkers #universityofminnesota #teacherscollege #alphakappaalphasorority

322
2 months ago

#augustteacherphotochallenge Day 9: black and white #lategram (again) This is my first example of an extra credit assignment I want to offer this year. Take a picture with a historical marker and then dig deeper into the story. Robert Ruark was an author and journalist. He started college at 15 years old. He wrote a column in the Washington Daily news that earned him more than $40,000 a year in the 1940s. He had served in World War II as a gunnery officer and a press censor. #teachersofinstagram #extracredit #historicalmarkers #wilmingtonnc #southportnc

00
2 months ago

The Central Carolina Convalescent Hospital had seven single-story wings with 134 beds. There was an operating room, rooms with iron lungs, rooms with wading pools and whirlpools — hydrotherapy was a popular treatment method — and a school so ill children could keep up with their studies. Families brought their young ones from all over the state for treatment. Though most regular hospitals in the South were racially segregated, this one wasn’t. The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which donated equipment, supplies and nurses, had a policy of caring for all children. Greensboro’s polio hospital also employed both blacks and whites. In 1963, the old polio hospital was pressed back into service as the community dealt with another public emergency. In May of that year, black youth — thousands of students from N.C. A&T, Bennett College and Dudley High School — took to downtown streets to force the city’s movie theaters, restaurants and motels to integrate. Police arrested hundreds. But the students refused to leave jail. When jail cells filled up, authorities put students in makeshift detention centers — the county prison farm, a National Guard armory and, finally, the old polio hospital. Four hundred young people, many of them female students from Bennett, were packed into the old hospital. There weren’t enough beds or toilets or privacy. And everyone remembered the hospital’s original purpose. “For the students, it was a particularly traumatic place to be held,” said Parsons, an assistant professor of history and UNCG’s director of public history. After three weeks of daily protests and mass arrests, city leaders gave in and asked local businesses to serve black customers. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

655
2 months ago

Anthony Burns (31 May 1834 – 17 July 1862) was a fugitive slave whose recapturing, extradition, and court case led to wide-scale public outcries of injustice, and ultimately, increased opposition to slavery by Northerners. Burns was born a slave in Stafford County, Virginia. As a young man, he became a Baptist and a "slave preacher" at the Falmouth Union Church in Falmouth, Virginia. In 1853, he escaped from slavery and reached Boston, where he started working. The following year, he was captured under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 and tried in court. The Fugitive Slave Act was fiercely resisted in Boston, and Burns' case attracted national publicity, including large demonstrations, protests, attacks, and violence. Federal troops were employed to ensure Burns was transported without interference to a ship headed back to Virginia post-trial. Burns was eventually ransomed from slavery, with his freedom purchased by Boston sympathizers. Afterwards, he was educated at Oberlin College and became a Baptist preacher, moving to Upper Canada for a position, where he remained until his death. #homeschoolfieldtrip #homeschool #homeschoolouting #Blackhistory101 #blackhistory365 #Blackhistoryeveryday #blackhistoryfacts #Blackhistoryproject #historicalmarkers #Historicalplaces #Historicallocations #NCHistoricsites #APeoplesJourney #ANATIONSSTORY #NRHP #NPS #nationalregisterofhistoricplace

333
2 months ago

Lovely little place on Front Street just north of Peebles Island State Park. Unique sign format!

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